Author Archives: Connieay

About Connieay

I have taught English in Japan, Qatar and Egypt. At present, I'm taking a short break to raise my little munchkin and finishing a Masters on TESOL/Applied Linguistics. My teaching life started in Tokyo back in 2009. And yes, I was there during the massive earthquake in 2011. That day, I was in school waiting for my students to arrive. My very young learners did come after the quake and we all hid under the table during the numerous aftershocks we shared. That night I continued to teach my classes and was stuck in school as all the trains were stopped. I was taken in by the lovely Miss Satou and shared that eerie night with her shaken dog Oscar which kept licking my face throughout the night. Before teaching, I lived and worked in London as a science editor and researcher. I enjoy dancing salsa and love travelling. Having a Chinese root means food is crucial to ensure my happy existence. Teaching is an experiment that I hope to carry on for a long time. I am interested in multilingualism, CLIL and how the brain is involved in learning. If I were a bird, I would be an albatross, a bird with stamina, persistence and the ability to go far and high. I value long-term relationships but am perfectly happy being independent and can endure solitude if necessary.

Raising Multilingual Children

Last week I had the pleasure to attend the book launch for Raising Multilingual Children by Julia Festman, Gregory J. Poarch and Jean-Marc Dewaele published by Multilingual Matters, introduced by Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele at Birkberk College. Here are some of my thoughts on the talk and the book. Professor Dewaele is an entertainer. He started by […]

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Raising Multilingual Children

Last week I had the pleasure to attend the book launch for Raising Multilingual Children by Julia Festman, Gregory J. Poarch and Jean-Marc Dewaele published by Multilingual Matters, introduced by Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele at Birkberk College. Here are some of my … Continue reading

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Delta: a path from ‘teaching doings’ to ‘teaching beings’

‘It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life!’ Nine out of ten times, this is what I heard when people described their Delta experience. Undeterred, I remain skeptical but open to this ‘take’ of the ‘next big step’ … Continue reading

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Progress check

After the initial needs analysis, how do you make sure you have been doing what the learners really want in the way they want? Apart from informal chats and observations, I made a progress check document to discuss with my … Continue reading

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Shapes and relationships

Level: (Pre)Intermediate Length: 90-min twice a week Group size: 5 Topic from book: People we know Language practice: Asking questions, telling anecdote Running order: 1. ‘Back to the board’ to review expressions with ‘have’ (from previous lesson) 2. Introduce/review ‘shapes’ … Continue reading

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(The lack of) Dogme moments with my Japanese teachers

Today I had my third Japanese lesson. Just before we started, I had a brief chat with my other two classmates. Not surprisingly, none of us had had the chance to go over the materials we did in the previous … Continue reading

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Why feedback after task?

I was reading Ken Wilson’s post on his second German lesson on a crowded Tokyo train on my way home, like most of his readers, I found it difficult to contain my chuckles. I cannot emphasise how useful it is for … Continue reading

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The future of language teaching

In my last post a talk by Professor Richard Johnstone got me all worked up about the whole identity issue. What do we know about current modern language teaching around the world? How does that knowledge help us plan for … Continue reading

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Being bilingual

What is the future of language teaching? How do you feel about bilingual education? What is your own experience of learning a language? A couple of weeks ago, I went to a talk by Professor Richard Johnstone on modern language … Continue reading

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A learner’s perspective

The other day I suddenly realised I was finally ready to study Japanese properly. So I went along to a demo lesson. I am so excited to be a learner again. It was a 20-minute demo lesson. There were only … Continue reading

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